Sea Buckthorn Oil

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Ulcers

  • In 2013 Veterinary Medicine International published an animal study which found that sea buckthorn oil was more effective in treating gastric ulcers in dogs than 4 other commonly used ulcer drugs. [Source]

Blood clotting

  • In 2000 the Journal of Biochemistry published a crossover study which found that 12 healthy men who consumed sea buckthorn berry oil for a period of 4 weeks had a clear decrease in platelet aggregation (clumping together of blood platelet which can lead to blood clots) when compared to a control substance (coconut oil). [Source]

Atrophic vaginitis

  • In 2014 Maturitas published a double-blind clinical trial in which 116 postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy, including symptoms of dryness, itching or burning were assigned to either 3 grams of sea buckthorn oil or a placebo daily for 3 months. The sea buckthorn oil group demonstrated a significantly better rate of improvement and overall better vaginal health compared to the placebo group. The authors of the study noted that sea buckthorn oil may be an alternative for women unable to use estrogen treatment. [Source]

Beneficial lipid profile

  • In 2012 the Public Library of Science published a study examining the fatty acid profile of sea buckthorn oil which found that Canadian-grown sea buckthorn contained high levels of both linoleic acid and alpha linolenic acid, in a 1 :1 ratio, which the authors note is beneficial for human health. [Source]

Wound healing

  • In 2014 Advances in Skin and Wound Care published an animal study which compared the effectiveness of various substances for healing burns on rats. While both sea buckthorn and olive oil aided the healing process, a synergistic effect was seen when both substances were applied. The combination was more effective than either substance alone and significantly more effective than silver sulfadiazine – a treatment commonly applied to burns. [Source]
  • In 2009 Food and Chemical Toxicology published an animal study which demonstrated that sea buckthorn oil administered both orally an topically significantly improved burn healing in rats with no associated toxicity or side effects. [Source]
  • In 2014 Burns published an animal study which showed that topical sea buckthorn oil significantly improved burn healing in sheep. [Source]

Atherosclerosis

  • In 2007 Phytomedicine published an animal study which showed that sea buckthorn oil fed to normal rabbits for 18 days caused a significant decrease in bad cholesterol and atherogenic index. [Source]

Dry eye

  • In 2010 The Journal of Nutrition published a 3-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled study including 86 subjects which found that sea buckthorn oil positively affected dry eye during the cold season. [Source]

Eye protection

  • In 2016 Nutrients published an animal study which found that orally administered sea buckthorn oil protected the retinas of rabbits from light induced retinal damage. [Source]

Liver fibrosis

  • In 2003 the World Journal of Gastroenterology published a study based on 50 patients which found that sea buckthorn oil may have the potential to protect against and treat liver fibrosis. [Source]

Immune function

  • In 2016 the International Journal of Immunopathology and Pharmacology published an animal study which found that sea buckthorn oil suppressed stress hormones and increased immune cell function in chronically stressed rats. [Source]
  • In 2010 Veterinary Medicine International published an animal study which found that sea buckthorn berries protected 15-day old chicks from toxin-induced immune suppression. [Source]

Antioxidant

  • In 2015 the Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences published an in vitro study which found that sea buckthorn extract acted as a neuroprotectant against oxidative stress and neurodegeneration. [Source]

Heart protection

  • In 2011 the International Journal of Toxicology published an animal study which found that the free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities of sea buckthorn oil protected against chemically-induced cardio-toxicity in rats. [Source]

Anti-toxicity

  • In 2016 Veterinary World published an animal study which found that sea buckthorn leaf extract protected rats from lead poisoning. [Source]

Hypertension

  • In 2017 Clinical Nutrition published a double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving 105 subjects which found that sea buckthorn oil markedly reduced cholesterol, oxidized LDL (inflammatory LDL cholesterol) and triglycerides in subjects with high cholesterol, while also improving antioxidant status. [Source]

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