Royal Jelly

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Red Blood Cell Production and Mental Health

  • In 2012 Nutrition Journal published a double-blind, placebo-controlled study which evaluated the effects of 3 grams/day royal jelly compared to a placebo on 61 healthy volunteers for 6 months. The royal jelly group saw improved red blood cell production, glucose tolerance and mental health compared to the placebo group. [Source]

Antifatigue

  • In 2001 the Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology published an animal study which found that mice given royal jelly performed better in a swim test compared to a control group. The mice given royal jelly also showed significantly lower levels of lactate acid buildup and higher levels of remaining muscle glycogen after swimming. [Source]

Cancer-related Fatigue

  • In 2016 Electron Physician published a study which administered royal jelly or royal jelly with honey to 52 cancer patients undergoing treatment. After 2 and 4 weeks the patient group receiving royal jelly had reduced fatigue compared to the honey-only group. [Source]

Lowers Cholesterol

  • In 2007 the Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology published a trial which found that 15 volunteers who took 6 gram/day royal jelly saw significant decreases in LDL (bad) cholesterol and total cholesterol compared to a control group. The authors note that the results suggest that royal jelly lowers cholesterol by lowering VLDL (Very low density lipoprotein) levels.  [Source]

Lowers Blood Glucose

  • In 2009 the Journal of Medicinal Food published a which found that 20 healthy volunteers who consumed 20 grams of royal jelly had significantly lower blood glucose levels when compared to baseline levels. [Source]

Diabetic Foot Ulcers

  • In 2011 the Journal of Research in Medicinal Sciences published a study which found that a 5 percent royal jelly topical gel was effective in healing foot ulcers in 2 diabetic patients. [Source]

Diabetic Weight Management

  • In 2012 Health Promotion Perspectives published a clinical trial in which 50 female volunteers with type 2 diabetes were given either 1 gram of royal jelly or a placebo each day for 8 weeks. The royal jelly group consumed fewer calories and carbohydrates and lost weight while the placebo group did not. [Source]

Graves’ Disease

  • In 2006 Endocrine published an in vitro study which found that royal jelly may possess drug-like anti-thyroid and immune modulating effects, making it a potential candidate for the treatment of Graves’ disease. [Source]

Prevents Insulin Resistance

  • In 2008 Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin published an animal study which found that rats fed royal jelly for 8 weeks had significantly reduced insulin levels. The researchers concluded that royal jelly may be an effective functional food in the prevention of insulin resistance. [Source]

Osteoporosis

  • In 2012 Eklem Hastaliklari ve Cerrahisi (Joint Disease and Surgery) published an animal study which found that rats fed royal jelly had a decrease in bone loss due to osteoporosis after undergoing ovary removal surgery, when compared to a control group that also underwent ovary removal surgery. [Source]

Azathioprine Toxicity

  • In 2014 Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology published an animal study which found that royal jelly was able to protect against liver damage in rats treated with azathioprine (a drug used to prevent kidney transplant rejection). [Source]

Periodontal Disease

  • In 2011 Biomedical Research published an in vitro study which found that royal jelly possesses anti-inflammatory and osteoinductive (a process seen in bone healing) properties, which, according to the authors could make it beneficial for the treatment and prevention of periodontal diseases. [Source]

Chemotherapy

  • In 2013 the Journal of Pharmacological Sciences published an animal study which found that the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative stress properties of royal jelly were effective in healing oral mucositis (ulcers of the mouth caused by chemotherapy) in hamsters. [Source]
  • In 2014 the International Journal of Otolaryngology published a clinical trial in which 13 patients with head and neck cancer were either given royal jelly 3 times per day or assigned to a control group (no treatment). The royal jelly group saw a significant reduction in chemotherapy-induced mucositis compared to the control group. [Source]
  • In 2011 Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity published an animal study in which royal jelly was effective in reducing oxidative stress and increasing glutathione (antioxidant) levels in the livers of rats treated with the chemotherapy drug, cisplatin. [Source]
  • In 2011 World Journal of Urology published an animal study in which the kidney damage in rats caused by the chemotherapy drug, cisplatin was partially reversed by treatment with royal jelly. [Source]

Kidney Stone Prevention

  • In 2015 the International Brazilian Journal of Urology published an animal study which found that the anti-inflammatory effects of royal jelly were able to help prevent urolithiasis (kidney stones) in rats given ethylene glycol (a compound shown to induce inflammation and renal damage). [Source]

Anti-inflammatory

  • In 2016 Mediators of Inflammation an in vitro study which found that three major fatty acids in royal jelly had potent dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effects. The authors conclude that the findings provide additional evidence for the use of royal jelly against inflammatory diseases. [Source]
  • In 2015 the Jundishapur Journal of Natural Pharmaceutical Products published an animal study which found that royal jelly was effective in reducing edemas (swelling due to inflammation) induced in the hind paws of rats. According to the researchers, royal jelly has potent anti-inflammatory effects comparable to aspirin. [Source]

Protection Against Skin Aging

  • In 2012 the Journal of Medicinal Food published an animal study involving female rats with estrogen deficiency caused by the removal of both ovaries. The estrogen deficiency lead to a reduction in collagen and thinner skin. Supplementation of one percent royal jelly in the diet restored collagen to close to normal levels, thus protecting against skin aging. [Source]

Oxidative Stress

  • In 2011 North American Journal of Medicinal Sciences published an animal study in which rats exposed to gamma radiation that were administered royal jelly before and during radiation treatments had reduced oxidative stress and tissue injury compared to a control group (exposed to radiation without royal jelly). [Source]

Alzheimer’s Disease

  • In 2012 Advanced Biomedical Research published an animal study in which rats that were induced with sporadic Alzheimer’s disease received food containing royal jelly or regular food. The royal jelly group performed better in spatial learning and memory tests, suggesting the potential neuroprotective role of royal jelly may be useful in treating Alzheimer’s. [Source]

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus SLE

  • In 2016 Food and Nutrition Research published a study in which 20 children with SLE received 2 grams of royal jelly daily for 12 weeks. Compared to baseline levels and to a control group, the children in the treatment group saw significant improvements in a number of immune system markers. [Source]

Cellular Protection

  • In 2016 the Journal of Medical Physics published study in which blood samples were taken on days 0, 4, 7, and 14 from six males taking one gram of royal jelly per day for 14 days. The blood samples were then exposed to radiation. The rate of cell death reduced during the experiment with the most significant reduction in cell death after 14 days of royal jelly consumption. [Source]

Male Reproductive Health for Diabetics

  • In 2016 the International Journal of Reproductive Biomedicine published an animal study in which rats induced with diabetes were treated with royal jelly for 6 weeks. Compared to a control group of diabetic rats, the rats treated with royal jelly had reduced diabetes-induced impairment of the testis. The authors theorize that the effect is likely to due to the antioxidant properties of royal jelly. [Source]
  • In 2015 the International Journal of Fertility and Sterility published a study which found that diabetic rats treated with royal jelly had improved sperm count, mobility, viability and testosterone levels compared to diabetic rats in a control group (not treated with royal jelly). [Source]

Male Reproductive Health For Stanozolol Users

  • In 2015 the Iranian Journal of Reproductive Medicine published an animal study which tested the effects of royal jelly supplementation on mice treated with stanozolol – a synthetic steroid often abused by males which can lead to reproductive toxicity. The results showed that while stanozolol decreased sperm count, motility and fertilization rate and increased sperm DNA damage, royal jelly administration restored these parameters to near normal levels. [Source]

Dry Eyes

  • In 2014 the Public Library of Science published an animal study which tested the oral administration of 5 honey bee products – royal jelly, raw honey, pollen propolis and larva – on rats bred to have dry eyes. Royal jelly restored tear secretion capacity to the largest extent. [Source]

Colitis

  • In 2015 Scientific World Journal published an animal study in which mice induced with colitis had reduced inflammation and lesions when administered royal jelly. [Source]
  • In 2010 the European Journal of Histochemistry published an animal study in which found that rats with induced colitis had a reduction in mast cells – cells present during inflammatory responses – and reduced colonic erosion when treated orally with royal jelly compared to a control group. [Source]
  • In 2015 the Iranian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences published an animal study which showed that oral supplementation with royal jelly inhibited systemic inflammation and protected the gastrointestinal tract in rats with induced colitis. [Source]

Male Fertility

  • In 2014 the Iranian Journal of Reproductive Medicine published an animal study which tested the effects of royal jelly on rats treated with the chemotherapy drug, bleomycin. While the drug caused a significant decline in sperm count, motility, viability and testosterone levels, these effect were mitigated in rats also treated with royal jelly. [Source]

Diabetic Health

  • In 2015 the Iranian Journal of Public Health published a clinical trail in which patients with type 2 diabetes were given 1 gram of royal jelly or a placebo 3 times daily for 8 weeks. Compared to the placebo group, the royal jelly group saw a significant increase in total antioxidant capacity and a reduction in insulin resistance. [Source]

 

 

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