Ginseng

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Erectile dysfunction

  • In 2008 the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published a meta-analysis of 7 controlled trials which showed that red ginseng was effective in treating erectile dysfunction. However the authors of the study noted that the total sample size and methodological quality of the studies were too low to draw definitive conclusions. [Source]
  • In 2002 the Journal of Urology published a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study in which 45 patients with erectile dysfunction saw improvements in their condition as well as improved sexual performance when treated with 900 mg of ginseng 3 times daily for 8 weeks. [Source]
  • In 2007 the Asian Journal of &rology published a double-blind study in which 60 patients with mild-to-moderate erectile dysfunction received either 1000 mg of Korean red ginseng 3 times daily or a placebo. After 12 weeks of treatment 66 percent of the ginseng group saw significant improvements in rigidity, penetration and maintenance, while no change was seen in the placebo group. [Source]

Erectile dysfunction – diabetics

  • In 2005 Urology published an animal study which showed that Korean red ginseng may have potential in treating erectile dysfunction in diabetics. [Source]

Male Infertility – diabetics

  • In 2011 Endocrine Regulations published an animal study which found that diabetic rats had improvements in fertility and testicular antioxidants and reductions in oxidative stress and testicular damage after treatment with ginseng extract. [Source]

Diabetics

  • In 2016 Medicine published a meta-analysis of 8 studies for which the data showed that ginseng supplementation improved glucose control and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose intolerance. [Source]

Male reproductive health

  • In 2016 the Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine published a double-blind study involving 80 male infertility patients which found that, compared to a placebo, Korean red ginseng improved sperm concentration, motility, morphology and viability after 12 weeks. [Source]
  • In 2017 Experimental Gerontology published an animal study which showed that long-term (6 months) Korean red ginseng administration significantly delayed aging-induced testicular dysfunction in rats. [Source]
  • In 2016 Animal Reproduction Science published an animal study which showed that ginseng root extract had positive effects on male reproductive functions through the suppression of reactive oxygen species production – substances which cause cellular damage. [Source]  
  • In 2015 Experimental Gerontology published an animal study which showed that 6 months of daily supplementation with Korean red ginseng protected rats from age induced testicular dysfunction while significantly restoring sperm count. [Source]
  • In 2012 Cell Journal published an animal study which showed that 6 weeks of supplementation with American ginseng protected rats from toxic effects of the chemotherapy drug cyclophosphamide on sperm quality. [Source]
  • In 2016 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an in vitro study which found that panax ginseng protected sperm against DNA damage caused by the estrogen substance, zearalenol – which may contaminate herbs and crops. [Source]
  • In 2015 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an animal study which showed that Korean red ginseng protected mice against damage to the male reproductive system caused by the chemotherapy drug, busulfan. [Source]
  • In 2016 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an animal study which showed that panax ginseng protected against oxidative-stress-induced male subfertility and age-induced male subfertility. [Source]

Safety review

  • In 2013 the Public Library of Science (PLoS) published a review of 30 clinical trials published in Korean literature which showed did that ginseng appears to be generally safe with no serious side effects having been reported. [Source]

Protective effects against herpes simplex virus

  • In 2013 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an animal study which found that Korean red ginseng (KRG) provided resistance against herpes simplex virus (HSV) vaginal infection in mice, with results showing decrease clinical severity, increase survival rate and accelerated viral clearance. The authors note that the immune enhancing effects of KRG may be useful for helping overcome HSV infection. [Source] 

Immune function – Chemotherapy

  • In 2012 the Journal of Ginseng Research published a study involving 30 children who were treated for leukemia and solid cancer with chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation. Compared to a control group of 11 patients, 19 patients who received Korean red ginseng for one year saw a more rapid decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokines. [Source]

Immune function

  • In 2010 the American Journal of Chinese Medicine published an in vitro study which showed that panax ginseng triggered immune responses. [Source]  

Immune function – Influenza A

  • In 2012 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an animal study which found that Korean red ginseng combined with the influenza vaccine improved the survival rate among mice when compared with the vaccine alone. [Source]
  • In 2014 Nutrients published a two-part study which showed that treatment with Korean red ginseng reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory human genes in an in vitro setting and stimulated antiviral cytokine production in mice infected with the influenza virus. [Source]
  • In 2012 the Public Library of Science published a study which showed that daily treatment with Panax ginseng moderately enhanced survival rates in mice infected with the 2009 H1N1 virus. [Source]

Immune function – Pseudomonas

  • In 2002 the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine published an animal study which showed that Gerimax ginseng stimulated immune function in rats, promoting the clearance of pneumonia aeruginosa. [Source]

Immune function – respiratory syncytial virus

  • In 2015 Nutrients published an animal study which found that red ginseng extract helped protect against respiratory synctial virus (a common infection that causes mild cold-like symptoms) in mice through multiple mechanisms including improving cell survival and inhibiting viral replication. [Source]

Immune function – Foot and mouth vaccine

  • In 2016 Immunopharmacology and Immunotoxicology published an animal study which found that ginseng leaf saponins significantly enhanced the immune response in mice to foot-and-mouth disease. [Source]

Immune function – Cold prevention

  • In 2005 the Canadian Medical Association Journal published a double-blind study in which 279 subjects with a history of at least two colds in the previous year took either 2 capsules of North American ginseng or placebo daily for a period of 4 months. The results showed that subjects in the ginseng group had a significant reduction in number of colds and severity of cold symptoms during the study period. [Source]

Immune function

  • In 2016 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an animal study which found that Korean red ginseng had immunological benefits in mice during cyclosporine (immunosuppressive drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis) treatment. [Source]

Diabetes prevention

  • In 2016 the Public Library of Science published an animal study which found that black ginseng extract counteracts diabetes in mice through various mechanisms, including protecting white blood cells and reducing hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and inflammation. [Source]
  • In 2014 the Journal of Medicinal Food published an animal study which showed that Chinese ginseng prevented weight gain and insulin resistance in mice fed a high-fat diet. [Source]

Improved memory

  • In 2010 Psychopharmacology published a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial in which 32 subjects received 3 doses of an American ginseng based supplement. Following administration the ginseng group displayed significant improvements in working memory. [Source]
  • In 2000 Psychopharmacology published a double-blind, 14-week study in which 256 middle-aged participants received either a supplement containing both ginkgo biloba and panax ginseng or a placebo. The results showed that the ginkgo/ginseng supplement improved memory by an average 7.5 percent, with benefits to both long-term and working memory. [Source]
  • In 2015 Human Psychopharmacology published a double-blind, crossover study in which 52 healthy volunteers between the ages of 40 and 60 years old received either 200 mg of an American ginseng-based extract or a placebo. Compared to the placebo, the ginseng supplement improved cognitive performance and working memory, measured at 3 hours after consumption. [Source]
  • In 2016 the Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis published an animal study which showed that ginseng improved memory in rats through the regulation of various essential compounds including amino acids and neurotransmitters. [Source]

Protection against alcohol induced memory dysfunction

  • In 2005 Archives of Pharmacal Research published an animal study which showed that Panax ginseng extract significantly reversed alcohol-induced memory dysfunction in mice. [Source]

Mood and cognition

  • In 2002 Physiology and Behavior published a double-blind, crossover study which compared ginkgo, ginseng, a ginkgo/ginseng combination supplement and a placebo in 20 participants. The results supported previous findings, with all three supplements improving memory performance compared to a placebo. [Source]

Protects against cognitive impairment

  • In 2010 the Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology published an animal study in which rats treated with wild ginseng exhibited improved maze test performance and neuroprotective effects after being injected with the anti-nausea drug, scopolamine – which is known to cause memory loss and neural impairment. [Source]

Chronic fatigue syndrome

  • In 2013 the Public Library of Science published a 90-patient, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial which found that administration of 2 grams of Panax ginseng daily for 4 weeks provided anti-fatigue effects in patients with idiopathic chronic fatigue. [Source]

Anti-fatigue

  • In 2016 Nutrients published and animal study which found that 30 days of ginseng treatment significantly increased forced swimming time and reduced blood lactic acid in mice, while also counteracting fatigue-induced oxidative stress and reductions in antioxidant enzymes. [Source] 
  • In 2016 the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine published a double-blind study involving 52 subjects which found that 4 weeks of supplementation with 2000 mg/day of an enzyme-modified ginseng extract reduced fatigue more than a placebo. [Source]

Anti-fatigue in NAFLD patients

  • In 2016 the Journal of Ginseng Research published a 3-week, placebo-controlled trial involving 80 patients which found that Korean red ginseng may be effective in reducing inflammation and fatigue in overweight patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. [Source]

Alcoholics liver disease

  • In 2014 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an animal study which found that Korean red ginseng protected mice from alcohol induced steatosis (build up of fat in the liver). [Source]

MS-related fatigue

  • In 2013 the International Journal of Neuroscience published a 60-patient, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in which female patients with multiple sclerosis experienced a reduction in fatigue and a significant positive effect on quality of life after treatment with 250 mg ginseng, twice daily for 3 months. [Source] 

Cancer-related fatigue

  • In 2015 Integrative Cancer Therapies published a study in which 24 patients with cancer-related fatigue received high-dose panax ginseng equal to 800 mg daily for 29 days. At the end of the study 87 percent of participants had improved fatigue scores. Significant improvements in quality of life, appetite and sleep were also recorded. [Source]
  • In 2010 Supportive Care in Cancer published a double-blind trial in which 292 patients with cancer-related fatigue were given either a placebo or 750 mg, 1000 mg or 2000 mg of American ginseng twice daily for 8 weeks. Compared to the placebo, over twice as many patients treated with ginseng perceived a reduction in fatigue. [Source]

Colon cancer

  • In 2011 the Journal of Ginseng Research published a two-part study which showed that in vitro, red ginseng extract suppressed the spread of human colon cancer cells and had a similar effect when studied in vivo in mice. [Source]
  • In 2010 Carcinogenesis published an animal study which found that mice induced with colitis experienced protection from colitis-driven colon cancer when treated with American ginseng. [Source]
  • In 2015 the Journal of Ginseng Research published and animal study which showed that American ginseng significantly reduced experimentally induced colitis and colon carcinogenesis in mice by reducing the size and number of tumors as well as reducing pro-inflammatory cytokines. [Source]

Protects against acute respiratory illness

  • In 2012 the Journal of Korean Medical Science published a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 100 volunteers which found that subjects who were treated with Korean red ginseng had significantly fewer acute respiratory infections and lower symptom scores when compared to participants who received a placebo. [Source] 

Atopic dermatitis

  • In 2017 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an animal study which found that induced atopic-dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice were reduced by the administration of Korean red ginseng extract. [Source]
  • In 2011 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an animal study which found that Korean red ginseng applied topically significantly improved scratching behavior and induced atopic-dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice. [Source]
  • In 2011 the Journal of Ginseng Research published a trial in which 30 patients with atopic dermatitis took Korean red ginseng for 16 weeks. The results showed a significant improvement in both skin hydration and atopic dermatitis severity scores. [Source] 
  • In 2013 the Journal of Ethnopharmacology published an animal study which found that oral administration of Korean red ginseng in mice significantly prevented water loss from skin while suppressing various pro-inflammatory markers. Based on these findings, the authors noted that Korean red ginseng may be useful for the prevention of atopic dermatitis. [Source]
  • In 2017 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an animal study which found that mice with anaphylactic shock and chemically induced atopic-dermatitis-like skin lesions saw protection through the administration of Korean red ginseng, with a reduction in a systemic inflammation marker known as tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a). [Source]
  • In 2011 International Immunopharmacology published an animal study which showed that ginseng extract was found to have anti-inflammatory effects that were beneficial to the treatment of atopic dermatitis in mice. [Source]
  • In 2017 the Journal of Korean Medical Science published an animal study which found that Korean red ginseng mediated inflammation and diminished itching sensation in mice with atopic dermatitis. [Source]
  • In 2012 the Journal of pharmacological Sciences published an animal study which found that mice with induced atopic dermatitis had significantly inhibited scratching behavior when treated with Korean red ginseng. [Source]
  • In 2011 the Journal of Ethnopharmacology published an animal study which found that Korean red ginseng reduced clinical severity of atopic dermatitis while decreasing the systemic inflammatory marker, tumor necrosis factor-a  (TNF-a) in mice. [Source]
  • In 2011 Immune Network published an in vitro study which showed that Korean red ginseng dose-dependently decreased systemic inflammation markers and increased free radical scavenging antioxidant activity in human skin cells. Based on these results, researchers concluded that Korean red ginseng extract may be a useful immunosuppressive agent in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. [Source] 

Anti-itch

  • In 2015 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an animal study which found that Korean red ginseng extract had an antipruritic (anti-itch) effect on histamine-induced scratching in mice. [Source]

Allergies

  • In 2013 the Journal of Ginseng Research published in animal study which found that Korean red ginseng reduced nasal allergic inflammatory reaction in mice by reducing inflammatory cytokines. [Source]

Seasonal allergies

  • In 2011 Allergy, Asthma & Immunology research published a 4-week, double-blind study in which 59 patients with perennial allergies received either fermented red ginseng or a placebo. The results show that the ginseng group had significantly reduced nasal congestion along with a significant improvement in quality of life scores, while no change was seen in the placebo group. [Source]

Food allergies

  • In 2010 the Journal of Ethnopharmacology published in animal study which found that red ginseng extract inhibited allergic reactions to food in mice by reducing immune system response to antigens. [Source]

Antioxidant

  • In 2017 the Journal of Ginseng Research published a review of various studies on the effects of red ginseng on diseases in humans and animals. According to the authors, although further clinical studies are warranted, ginseng appears to possess antioxidant activities which help prevent stress-associated chronic diseases. [Source]
  • In 2011 the Journal of Food and Chemical Toxicology published a double-blind study in which 82 participants received either a placebo or 1 or 2 grams of panax ginseng daily for 4 weeks. The results showed that ginseng significantly reduced serum levels of reactive oxygen species (pro-oxidants) and enhanced antioxidant defense mechanisms. Additionally, total glutathione (a critical antioxidant) content was significantly improved in participants who received 2 grams of ginseng daily. [Source]
  • In 2011 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an animal study in which diabetic-induced rats were treated with fermented red ginseng. Compared to a control group also induced with diabetes, rats treated with ginseng saw a significant reduction in enzymes known to cause liver damage as well as significant increases in glutathione, which was depleted in the diabetic control group. [Source]
  • In 2004 Biochimica et Biophysica Acta published an in vitro study which found that cells exposed to hazardous chemicals had a significant reduction in cell death when pre-treated with American ginseng berry extract. [Source]
  • In 2012 Nutrition Research published in animal study which found that Korean red ginseng significantly protected rats from aged-induced vital organ damage and depleted antioxidant levels. [Source]
  • In 2009 Food and Chemical Toxicology published an animal study which found that ginseng root extract protected mice from cadmium-induced liver toxicity, while restoring antioxidant levels. [Source]
  • In 2008 the American Journal of Chinese Medicine published an in vitro study in which pancreatic cells exposed to oxidative stress were protected from damage when incubated with American ginseng berry extract for 48 hours. According to the authors, the data suggests that ginseng’s ability to lower blood sugar may be related to its antioxidant effects on pancreatic cells. [Source] 
  • In 2015 the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine published in animal study which showed that ginseng treatment significantly reduced inflammation in rats with spinal cord injury. [Source]

Antioxidant – Liver protection

  • In 2012 the International Journal of Molecular Sciences published an animal study which showed that red ginseng essential oil protected mice from liver toxicity through the activation of antioxidant enzymes. [Source]
  • In 2015 the Journal of Cancer Published an animal study which found that supplementation of 1 percent Korean red ginseng in the diet of rats exposed to liver toxic substances protected against liver damage by increasing glutathione levels and decreasing oxidative cell damage. [Source]
  • In 2016 Laboratory Animal Research published an animal study which found that rats fed a high-fat diet supplemented with panax ginseng had significantly improved lipid profiles, including reduced LDL cholesterol and increased HDL cholesterol, when compared to a control group fed a high-fat diet alone. [Source]
  • In 2011 the Journal of Ginseng Research published in animal study which found that Korean red ginseng significantly reduced inflammation and liver toxicity in rats treated with a carcinogen produced by certain molds, known as aflatoxin. [Source]

Antioxidant – neuro-protection

  • In 2013 Acta Neurochirurgica published an animal study in which ginseng was found to display antioxidant and neuroprotective activity in rats. [Source]

Antioxidant – cardio-protection

  • In 2014 the Journal of Medicinal Food published in animal study which showed that red ginseng significantly reduced cardiac dysfunction in male porcine through the reduction of oxidative stress. [Source]

Antioxidant – Aged ginseng

  • In 2016 Preventive Nutrition and Food Science published a study comparing aged ginseng with red and white ginseng. The results showed that both in vivo and in vitro, aged ginseng exhibited greater antioxidant activity. [Source]

Antioxidant – colorectal cancer

  • In 2010 Cancer Left published an in vitro study which showed that red ginseng possesses anti-cancer properties which can promote cell death in colon cancer cells. [Source]

Ulcerative colitis

  • In 2008 Carcinogenesis published a 2-part study which showed that American ginseng can both prevent and treat colitis in vitro and in mice by reducing inflammation and preventing mucosal and DNA damage associated with colitis. [Source]
  • In 2015 the Journal of Ethnopharmacology published an animal study which showed that red ginseng promoted the growth of beneficial probiotics bifidobacterium and lactobacillus, while also inhibiting the growth of pathogens strains, both of which contributed to improved structure of gut microbiota and the relief of ulcerative colitis symptoms in mice. [Source]
  • In 2016 Nutrients published in animal study which found that mice induced with colitis exhibited improvements in appearance of the colon wall as well as the suppression of inflammatory immune system responses. [Source]
  • In 2010 Cancer Prevention Research published an animal study which showed that American ginseng protected mice from ulcerative colitis by reducing the number of inflammatory cells through apoptosis (programmed cell death). [Source]
  • In 2015 BMB Reports Published an animal study which found that fermented wild ginseng reduced the severity of colitis in mice by decreasing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in colonic tissue. [Source]

Antioxidant – prevents DNA damage

  • In 2012 Nutrition Journal published an 8-week, double-blind trial in which 15 subjects consumed either 3 or 6 grams/day Korean red ginseng or a placebo. The results showed participants in the ginseng groups exhibited a significant increase in an antioxidant enzyme that repairs cells, known as superoxide dismutase, as well as attenuated lymphocyte DNA damage. [Source]
  • In 2016 the Journal of Intercultural Ethnopharmacology published a study in which blood tests from 7 subjects who ingested ginseng showed that ginseng extract protected DNA in human lymphocytes from oxidative damage. [Source]
  • In 2015 the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition published a study in which 14 subjects received either a placebo (water) or freshly-prepared ginseng tea. Based on blood samples taken before and 2 hours post ingestion, results showed a significant decrease in DNA damage in the ginseng group while no change was seen in the control group. According to the authors, the study demonstrates that a single cup of tea infused with American ginseng can protect cellular DNA from oxidative stress. [Source]

Calmness and memory

  • In 2010 Human Psychopharmacology published an double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study involving 30 volunteers which showed that 400 mg/day panax for 8 days ginseng improved calmness and mental arithmetic. [Source]

Improved cognition

  • In 2012 the Journal of Ginseng Research published a double-blind study in which 15 subjects received either 4,500 mg of red ginseng or a placebo daily for 2 weeks. Based on tests designed to measure brain response, the results suggested that red ginseng was associated with improved cognitive function. [Source]

Anti-stress

  • In 2010 Nutrition Research and Practice published an animal study which found that rats subjected to immobilization stress regained homeostasis when treated with ginseng. [Source]

White vs red ginseng

  • In 2013 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an in vitro study which found that red ginseng was more effective than white ginseng for preventing liver damage from oxidative stress. [Source]

Reduced cholesterol and cardiovascular risk

  • In 2011 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an animal study which showed that ginseng root combined with hawthorn was able to treat high cholesterol and help prevent cardiovascular disease in rats. [Source]

Reduced cholesterol and atherosclerosis

  • In 2013 Molecules published animal study which showed that white ginseng had a positive effect on hypercholesterolemia in rats fed a high cholesterol diet. [Source]

Anti-Aging – Prevents age related memory decline

  • In 2015 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an animal study which found that 3 months of treatment with red ginseng extract mitigated memory deterioration in aged mice through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. [Source]

Alzheimer’s

  • In 2013 the Journal of Ginseng Research published a study in which mice with impaired memory and increased beta-amyloid levels in the brain were treated with fermented ginseng extract for 4 months which lead to significant memory function recovery and reduction in beta-amyloid levels. [Source]
  • In 2008 Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders published a clinical trail in which 58 Alzheimer’s patients were given 4.5 grams/day panax ginseng powder for 12 weeks. Compared to a control group of 39 patients, the ginseng group had improved cognitive performances, which returned to levels of the control group after discontinuing ginseng. [Source]
  • In 2016 the Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry published an animal study which found that compound K extracted from red ginseng was able to provide neuroprotective effects in mice, suggesting it may be useful in the prevention of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s. [Source]
  • In 2015 Toxicology and Industry Health published a study which showed that panax ginseng root was as effective as the Alzheimer’s drug, memantine hydrochloride in improving memory in memory-impaired rats. [Source]
  • In 2011 The Journal of Ginseng Research published 24-week study in which 61 Alzheimer’s patients received either 4.5 or 9 grams/day Korean red ginseng or were assigned to a control group. After 24 weeks significant improvement in cognitive function was seen in both treatment groups, with the effect being sustained at the 2-year follow-up mark.

Become a Health Buff!

Get email updates when we publish new content

We will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email