Fertility

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CoQ10

  • In 2015 Aging Cell published a study that showed CoQ10 production was lower in the ovarian cells of aging females. The authors theorize that CoQ10 supplementation could improve ovarian cell quality and quantity, potentially improving fertility of older females. [Source]

Ashwagandha – Male infertility

  • In 2013 Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine published a study in which 46 males with low sperm count (oligospermia) received either 675 mg/day ashwagandha extract or a placebo for 90 days. At the end of the treatment period the ashwagandha group had a 167 percent increase in sperm count, a 53 percent increase in semen volume and a 57 percent increase in sperm motility while the placebo group showed minimal improvement. [Source]

Ginseng – Male Infertility – diabetics

  • In 2011 Endocrine Regulations published an animal study which found that diabetic rats had improvements in fertility and testicular antioxidants and reductions in oxidative stress and testicular damage after treatment with ginseng extract. [Source]

Ginseng

  • In 2016 the Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine published a double-blind study involving 80 male infertility patients which found that, compared to a placebo, Korean red ginseng improved sperm concentration, motility, morphology and viability after 12 weeks. [Source]
  • In 2017 Experimental Gerontology published an animal study which showed that long-term (6 months) Korean red ginseng administration significantly delayed aging-induced testicular dysfunction in rats. [Source]
  • In 2016 Animal Reproduction Science published an animal study which showed that ginseng root extract had positive effects on male reproductive functions through the suppression of reactive oxygen species production – substances which cause cellular damage. [Source]
  • In 2015 Experimental Gerontology published an animal study which showed that 6 months of daily supplementation with Korean red ginseng protected rats from age induced testicular dysfunction while significantly restoring sperm count. [Source]
  • In 2012 Cell Journal published an animal study which showed that 6 weeks of supplementation with American ginseng protected rats from toxic effects of the chemotherapy drug cyclophosphamide on sperm quality. [Source]
  • In 2016 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an in vitro study which found that panax ginseng protected sperm against DNA damage caused by the estrogen substance, zearalenol – which may contaminate herbs and crops. [Source]
  • In 2015 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an animal study which showed that Korean red ginseng protected mice against damage to the male reproductive system caused by the chemotherapy drug, busulfan. [Source]
  • In 2016 the Journal of Ginseng Research published an animal study which showed that panax ginseng protected against oxidative-stress-induced male subfertility and age-induced male subfertility. [Source]

Royal Jelly – Diabetics

  • In 2016 the International Journal of Reproductive Biomedicine published an animal study in which rats induced with diabetes were treated with royal jelly for 6 weeks. Compared to a control group of diabetic rats, the rats treated with royal jelly had reduced diabetes-induced impairment of the testis. The authors theorize that the effect is likely to due the antioxidant properties of royal jelly. [Source]
  • In 2015 the International Journal of Fertility and Sterility published a study which found that diabetic rats treated with royal jelly had improved sperm count, mobility, viability and testosterone levels compared to diabetic rats in a control group (not treated with royal jelly). [Source]

Royal Jelly – Stanozolol Users

  • In 2015 the Iranian Journal of Reproductive Medicine published an animal study which tested the effects of royal jelly supplementation on mice treated with stanozolol – a synthetic steroid often abused by males which can lead to reproductive toxicity. The results showed that while stanozolol decreased sperm count, motility and fertilization rate and increased sperm DNA damage, royal jelly administration restored these parameters to near normal levels. [Source]

Royal jelly

  • In 2014 the Iranian Journal of Reproductive Medicine published an animal study which tested the effects of royal jelly on rats treated with the chemotherapy drug, bleomycin. While the drug caused a significant decline in sperm count, motility, viability and testosterone levels, these effect were mitigated in rats also treated with royal jelly. [Source]

Acupuncture – Increased pregnancy rate

  • In 2002 Fertility and Sterility published a study in which 160 women undergoing assisted reproduction therapy (ART) were divided into two groups; one group which received acupuncture 25 minutes both before and after embryo transfer and a control group. The acupuncture group had 34 pregnancies out of 80 patients (42.5 percent) while the control group saw 21 pregnancies out of 80 patients (26.3 percent). [Source]
  • In 2006 Fertility and Sterility published a study involving 273 women which found that, compared to a control group, acupuncture significantly improved pregnancy rates in women receiving IVF (In Vitro Fertilization) when performed on the day of Embryo Transfer. [Source]

Acupuncture – Improved male fertility

  • In 2005 Fertility and Sterility published a study in which included 40 men with idiopathic oligospermia, asthenospermia, or teratozoospermia (conditions affecting sperm count, motility or quality). Twenty-eight of the men received acupuncture twice weekly for 5 weeks. Sperm samples from all 40 men were randomized and results showed that the acupuncture group saw significantly improved sperm quality compared to the control group. [Source]

Acupuncture – In Vitro Fertilisation – improved pregnancy rates

  • In 2008 BMJ published a meta-analysis including 7 trials and a total of 1366 women who received in vitro fertilization (IVF). The combined data showed that acupuncture give with embryo transfer improves pregnancy and live birth rates among women undergoing IVF. [Source]

Ketogenic diet – Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

  • In 2005 Nutrition and Metabolism published a 6-month pilot study in which 11 obese women with PCOS were instructed to limit their carbohydrate intake to 20 grams per day for 24 weeks. The 5 women that completed the study saw significant reductions in body weight, LH/FSH ratio (Luteinizing hormone to Follicle-stimulating hormone; a measurement that is elevated in women with PCOS) and free testosterone. Two of the women became pregnant despite past fertility troubles. [Source]

Maca – Sperm count

  • In 2007 &rologia published an animal study which found that 84 days of treatment with yellow or black maca increased sperm count in male rats. [Source]

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