Cruciferous Vegetables

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Reduced bladder cancer risk

  • In 2008 Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention published a study based on 275 individuals with bladder cancer and 825 individuals without bladder cancer which found a significant association between raw cruciferous vegetable intake and reduced risk for bladder cancer. The same relationship was not shown for cooked vegetables or fruit. [Source]

Broccoli – Reduced bladder cancer risk

  • In 2010 Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention published a study based on 239 bladder cancer patients which found a strong inverse relationship between bladder cancer mortality and raw broccoli intake. There were no significant relationships for any other individual cruciferous vegetable. [Source]

Reduced kidney cancer risk

  • In 2013 Nutrition and Cancer published a meta-analysis of 10 studies which found that overall cruciferous vegetable consumption was associated with a significant decrease in renal cell carcinoma (kidney cancer). [Source]

Colon cancer

  • In 2013 Annals of Oncology published a meta-analysis of 35 observational studies which found evidence that high intake of cruciferous vegetables was associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer. [Source]

Reduced total mortality

  • In 2011 The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published a meta-analysis of 2 population based studies involving 134,796 adults which found that both fruit and vegetable intake were inversely associated with total mortality (primarily related to cardiovascular disease) in men and women. Cruciferous vegetables in particular reduced mortality in a dose-dependent pattern. [Source]

Breast Cancer

  • In 2013 Breast published a meta-analysis of 13 studies which found that high intake of cruciferous vegetables was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. [Source]

Heart disease – Reduced risk

  • In 2008 Biomedical and Environmental Sciences published a study which found that 32 men with high cholesterol saw significant improvements in HDL and LDL cholesterol as well as antioxidant status after consuming 150 mL/day kale juice for 12 weeks. [Source]

Stomach and colorectal cancer

  • In 2003 Nutrition and Cancer published a study of 149 stomach cancer and 115 colorectal cancer patients (with controls for each group) which found that Chinese cabbage, broccoli, Hypsizigus marmoreus and Pholita nameko were associated with a lower risk for colorectal cancer and broccoli was associated with lower a risk for stomach cancer. [Source]

Prostate cancer

  • In 2004 Nutrition and Cancer published a study of 428 men with prostate cancer and 537 controls (no prostate cancer) which found that cruciferous vegetables and particularly broccoli (one of the highest sources of sulforaphane) were associated with lower prostate cancer risks and that men with the glutathione S-transferase M1 genotype present (which increases risk) and high broccoli intake had the greatest reduction in risk. [Source]
  • In 2012 the International Journal of Urology published a meta-analysis of 13 studies which found that cruciferous vegetable intake was correlated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer. [Source]

Reduced inflammation

  • In 2014 the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Diabetics published a study of 1005 middle-aged women which found that women who consumed more cruciferous vegetables had lower inflammatory biomarkers. [Source]

Various cancers

  • In 2012 Annals of Oncology published a meta-analysis of select studies which found that cruciferous vegetable consumption at least once a week was linked to significantly reduced risk for many types of common cancer including oral, esophagus, colorectal, breast and kidney. [Source]

Gastric cancer

  • In 2013 Cancer Science published a meta-analysis 22 studies which found evidence that high intakes of cruciferous vegetables was associated with 19 percent lower risk of gastric cancer. [Source]

Lung cancer

  • In 2004 Cancer Causes & Control published a study based on 716 cases of lung cancer and 939 controls which found that higher cruciferous vegetable intake reduced lung cancer risk in individuals with the GSTM1 genotype (increases cancer risk) present. [Source]

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