Alzheimer’s

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Blueberries

  • In 2003 Nutritional Neuroscience published an animal study which found that mice engineered to have Alzheimer’s performed maze tests normally and did not show elevated levels of amyloid beta (the primary trigger for Alzheimer’s) when blueberries were included in the diet starting at 4 months of age.

Bacopa

  • In 2008 the Journal of Ethnopharmacology published an in vitro study which found that bacopa protected neurons from cell death cased by beta-amyloid (a substance known to cause Alzheimer’s) while also promoting cell survival.

L-theanine

  • In 2009 Free Radical Biology and Medicine published an animal study which found that l-theanine protected mice from the memory-impairing effects of beta-amyloid (a substances which causes Alzheimer’s) while also reducing neuron cell death in the cortex and hippocampus of the brain and increasing glutathione (an antioxidant) levels.

Aromatherapy

  • In 2009 Psychogeriatrics published a study in which 17 elderly patients with Alzheimer’s disease received aromatherapy treatment in the morning and evening for 28 days. All patients showed significant improvement in personal orientation related to cognitive function.

Caffeine and Coffee

  • In 2010 the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease published an animal study which found that mice engineered to have Alzheimer’s disease that were given caffeine in their drinking water from young adulthood showed protection against memory impairment as well as lower levels of beta-amyloid. In addition, aged mice with cognitive impairment saw memory improvement and reduced beta-amyloid after 1-2 months of caffeine treatment.
  • In 2011 the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease published an animal study which showed that long-term exposure to caffeinated coffee both protected against Alzheimer’s disease and enhanced working memory in mice bred to have Alzheimer’s. Neither caffeine alone nor decaffeinated coffee provided the same benefits.

Ginseng 

  • In 2013 the Journal of Ginseng Research published a study in which mice with impaired memory and increased beta-amyloid levels in the brain were treated with fermented ginseng extract for 4 months which lead to significant memory function recovery and reduction in beta-amyloid levels.
  • In 2008 Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders published a clinical trail in which 58 Alzheimer’s patients were given 4.5 grams/day Panax ginseng powder for 12 weeks. Compared to a control group of 39 patients, the ginseng group showed improved cognitive performances which returned to levels of the control group after discontinuing ginseng.
  • In 2016 the Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry published an animal study which found that Compound K extracted from red ginseng showed neuroprotective effects in mice, suggesting it may be useful in the prevention of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s.
  • In 2015 Toxicology and Industry Health published an animal study which showed that Panax ginseng root was as effective as the Alzheimer’s drug memantine hydrochloride in improving memory in memory-impaired rats.
  • In 2011 The Journal of Ginseng Research published 24-week study in which 61 Alzheimer’s patients received either 4.5 or 9 grams/day Korean red ginseng or were assigned to a control group. After 24 weeks significant improvement in cognitive function was seen in both treatment groups, with the effect being sustained at the 2-year follow-up mark.

Resveratrol

  • In 2014 the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease published an animal study which showed that long-term resveratrol supplementation significantly prevented memory loss in an Alzheimer’s mouse model, while also reducing beta-amyloid concentrations.
  • In 2013 Age published an animal study which showed that resveratrol supplementation increased life expectancy in an Alzheimer’s mouse model, while also reducing cognitive impairment and decreasing amyloid levels.
  • In 2013 Neural Regeneration Research published an animal study which found that daily resveratrol administration in rats with dementia improved maze test escape times. Researchers also found increased levels of the antioxidant, glutathione and the protective enzyme, superoxide dismutase in various regions of the brain.
  • In 2015 Current Alzheimer’s Research published an in vitro study which found that resveratrol protected neuron cells through various mechanisms, while improving the expression of memory-associated proteins.
  • In 2016 Oncotarget published an animal study which demonstrated that resveratrol reversed memory and learning impairment in mice by preventing neuroinflammation and increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor – an important protein for brain function.
  • In 2009 Rejuvenation Research published an animal study which demonstrated that resveratrol may be effective in treating cognitive disorders in elderly individuals with an infection.

Royal jelly

  • In 2012 Advanced Biomed Research published an animal study which showed that Alzheimer’s-induced rats given royal jelly in their feed for 10 days performed better in maze tests compared to Alzheimer’s-induced rats that did not receive royal jelly.

Red wine

  • In 2009 the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease published a review which stated that recent evidence, based on an Alzheimer’s mouse model, showed that two different types of red wine – Cabernet and Muscadine – each worked to attenuate Alzheimer’s through unique mechanisms.

Garlic

  • In 2009 Phytotherapy Research published an in vitro study which showed that garlic inhibits amyloidogenic proteins – proteins that are linked to neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s.
  • In 2007 Phytotherapy Research published an animal study in which mice predisposed to develop Alzheimer’s disease were given aged garlic extract. The result was a decrease in memory deterioration. Based on these findings, the researchers theorize aged garlic extract may aid in preventing the progression Alzheimer’s disease.

Turmeric

  • In 2012 Ayu published a study of 3 Alzheimer’s patients which found that 12 weeks of treatment with turmeric powder capsules improved symptoms of irritability, agitation and anxiety. Continued improvements in memory were seen after one year of treatment.
  • In 2013 The American Journal of Chinese Medicine published an animal study which found that curcumin – the active component of turmeric – was able to improve spatial memory in rats induced with Alzheimer’s disease.

CoQ10

  • In 2011 Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease published an animal study that demonstrated improvements in symptoms and behavior in mice with Alzheimer’s disease after treatment with CoQ10.

Wheatgrass

  • In 2014 the Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine published an animal study which found that wheatgrass was able to significantly reduce oxidative stress in rats given aluminum chloride – which may provide value in the treatment and prevention of Alzheimer’s disease.

Coconut oil

  • In 2015 Nutricion Hospitalaria published a study in which patients with Alzheimer’s dementia were administered 40 ml/day extra virgin coconut oil. The results showed that coconut oil was most effective in improving cognitive function in female patients and patients with serve dementia.
  • In 2014 the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease published a pilot study which showed that, in vitro, coconut oil was able to improve neuron cell survival and help prevent mitochondrial alterations – two key factors in the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

 

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